Anonymous said: This may have been covered before, but given the increasing instances of characters existing in more than one media simultaneously, do you believe that continuity is still necessary in comics? Marvel has set it up so that even characters not familiar to the public at large can still be established relatively easily. We all knew Gardians was gonna be huge. Ant Man will likely be successful. Seems to me that this can open up print to more risks, more "Elseworlds" type of storylines .

brianmichaelbendis:

Continuity is incredibly important. Continuity is just like your own personal history. It defines who you are and how you got here.

But just like you don’t need to instantly access all of your personal history to live in the moment I think it’s a mistake for writers to constantly bombard the reader with information about the back story to make us believe the now. in fact I think it can be a crutch.

 I read a lot of comics and I see this kind of writing and I want to tell the writer just tell your story… don’t tell me everybody else’s story that came before you. only give me the information I need right now to enjoy this moment.

 me and quite a few of my friends have a real issue with comics that are just about other comics. if you’re doing that you damn well make sure you have a reason

 Especially characters with growing continuity that spans decades but really only supposedly a few years.  it can be a cumbersome mess that doesn’t actually help your story or the character at all.

 I know some people accuse me of ignoring continuity but that’s just plain ridiculous. what I don’t do is pander to an audience that knows every little bit of minutia. it’s okay that they know what they know. I know it too. my job is to make sure these characters are vital and living in the moment and as long as nothing has been contradicted i think its all cool

archiemcphee:

Behold the awesomeness that is Long Ma the fire-breathing dragon-horse, the latest creation by French artist François Delarozière and his art production company La Machine. The 46-ton kinetic sculpture stands almost 40 feet tall and features articulated limbs that can gallop, rear up, and fold beneath him when he wants to sit down. His neck rises and falls and his wonderfully expressive face features eyes that open and close. Best of all, his chest swells from the pressure building in his lungs before he exhales fantastic plumes of smoke from his nostrils and jets of fire from his mouth.

This marvelous interactive sculpture was just debuted in the French city of Nantes and will soon be traveling to Beijing where he’ll be presented in October as part of the celebration of the 50th anniversary of diplomatic relations between France and China. Long Ma is based on a creature from Chinese mythology, Longma, a fabled winged horse with dragon scales, and will be the hero of a performance entitled “Long Ma Jing Shen” or “The Spirit of the Horse Dragon” during which he’ll face off against a giant spider.

Click here and here for video footage of Long Ma in all his fiery glory.

Visit the La Machine Facebook page for additional images.

[via Kotaku:Screenburn and Laughing Squid]

(via tawnyscostumesandcuriosities)

brianmichaelbendis:

Duncan Rouleau ~ the Metal Men #s 1-8 & the Hardcover.

(Source: ungoliantschilde)

mohrigan:

Foamy Leather Effect
My page: www.facebook.com/m.cosplay
1. Get you patter with plastic wrap and masking tape.
2. Paste and cut pattern in foamy twice.
3. Use one for base and another for cutting the wavy strips.
4. Glue them and use 2 layers of modge podge.
5. Use a mop sponge to make the paint effect.
6. Seal the paint w thin layer of modge podge.
7. Add a zipper in the back and you done!

mohrigan:

Foamy Leather Effect

My page: www.facebook.com/m.cosplay

1. Get you patter with plastic wrap and masking tape.

2. Paste and cut pattern in foamy twice.

3. Use one for base and another for cutting the wavy strips.

4. Glue them and use 2 layers of modge podge.

5. Use a mop sponge to make the paint effect.

6. Seal the paint w thin layer of modge podge.

7. Add a zipper in the back and you done!

(via tawnyscostumesandcuriosities)

cosplay-gamers:

Leaf Man Helmet Creation Process by Pasiphilo
These are the general steps I went through to construct my Leaf Man cosplay helmet. This was the first such helmet I’d ever made, so I don’t consider myself an expert by any stretch, but perhaps my experience with it will be helpful or interesting to others attempting the same thing. You can see the finished helmet here.
1. In constructing this helmet, I referred primarily to the Leaf Man helmet concept art by Sang Jun Lee on page 41 of The Art of Blue Sky Studio’s Epic. The final helmet design that appears in the movie is a little different from the concept drawing, but I liked the look of concept design and because it was presented in convenient front, side, rear and three-quarter views, it made for a very helpful guide.
2. I started with the cranium which I assembled from corrugated cardboard strips to fit my own head. This served as the base to which all the other pieces were attached. I used a glue gun to attach everything.
3 & 4. Using a combination of cereal box cardboard and corrugated cardboard, I started cutting out shapes to match the basic sections of the concept art helmet as accurately as I could. This was largely a trial-and-error process and often involved tearing off pieces to replace them with more accurately shaped ones.
5. I used strips of cereal box cardboard to bridge the larger gaps between the sections where the helmet is supposed to be smooth. (This turned out to be a problem later on when I began applying the paper mache paste because the moisture caused the thinner cereal box cardboard to buckle and lose it’s shape. I think I could avoid this problem in the future by coating the entire cardboard form in gesso or a water resistant medium before applying the paper mache.)
6. Using the quick-drying paper mache technique demonstrated by the ingenious Jonni Good of UltimatePaperMache.com in her excellent tutorial on “How to make a pantalone mask”, I covered the cardboard with paper mache that hardened into a very durable skin once completely dry. I was able to fill in the “dents” caused by the buckled cereal box cardboard with a combination of Jonni’s equally ingenious homemade air-dry clay and drywall compound; once that dried, I sanded the entire helmet with 80 to 160 grit sandpaper until it was smooth.
7. Referring now to screenshots taken from the movie and allowing myself a bit of artistic license, I carefully painted the final design onto the helmet with Americana brand crafters’ acrylic paint.
8. To give the paint some protection from scuffing and moisture, I sprayed the entire helmet - inside and out - with two coats of Pebeo Satin Finish Picture Varnish for acrylic colours, which also gave it the semi-gloss finish I wanted. For the final touch, I affixed the feather-like scale mail, which I made from green felt, to the back of the helmet.

9. The end result!

cosplay-gamers:

Leaf Man Helmet Creation Process by Pasiphilo

These are the general steps I went through to construct my Leaf Man cosplay helmet. This was the first such helmet I’d ever made, so I don’t consider myself an expert by any stretch, but perhaps my experience with it will be helpful or interesting to others attempting the same thing. You can see the finished helmet here.

1. In constructing this helmet, I referred primarily to the Leaf Man helmet concept art by Sang Jun Lee on page 41 of The Art of Blue Sky Studio’s Epic. The final helmet design that appears in the movie is a little different from the concept drawing, but I liked the look of concept design and because it was presented in convenient front, side, rear and three-quarter views, it made for a very helpful guide.

2. I started with the cranium which I assembled from corrugated cardboard strips to fit my own head. This served as the base to which all the other pieces were attached. I used a glue gun to attach everything.

3 & 4. Using a combination of cereal box cardboard and corrugated cardboard, I started cutting out shapes to match the basic sections of the concept art helmet as accurately as I could. This was largely a trial-and-error process and often involved tearing off pieces to replace them with more accurately shaped ones.

5. I used strips of cereal box cardboard to bridge the larger gaps between the sections where the helmet is supposed to be smooth. (This turned out to be a problem later on when I began applying the paper mache paste because the moisture caused the thinner cereal box cardboard to buckle and lose it’s shape. I think I could avoid this problem in the future by coating the entire cardboard form in gesso or a water resistant medium before applying the paper mache.)

6. Using the quick-drying paper mache technique demonstrated by the ingenious Jonni Good of UltimatePaperMache.com in her excellent tutorial on “How to make a pantalone mask”, I covered the cardboard with paper mache that hardened into a very durable skin once completely dry. I was able to fill in the “dents” caused by the buckled cereal box cardboard with a combination of Jonni’s equally ingenious homemade air-dry clay and drywall compound; once that dried, I sanded the entire helmet with 80 to 160 grit sandpaper until it was smooth.

7. Referring now to screenshots taken from the movie and allowing myself a bit of artistic license, I carefully painted the final design onto the helmet with Americana brand crafters’ acrylic paint.

8. To give the paint some protection from scuffing and moisture, I sprayed the entire helmet - inside and out - with two coats of Pebeo Satin Finish Picture Varnish for acrylic colours, which also gave it the semi-gloss finish I wanted. For the final touch, I affixed the feather-like scale mail, which I made from green felt, to the back of the helmet.

9. The end result!

(via tawnyscostumesandcuriosities)

I loved this game. I’m getting ready to play it again in fact.

steampunktendencies:

The Royal Greenhouses of Laeken (Dutch: Koninklijke Serres van Laken, French: Serres Royales de Laeken), are a vast complex of monumental heated greenhouses in the park of the Royal Palace of Laeken in the north of Brussels. It is one of the major tourist attractions of the city.

The complex was commissioned by King Leopold II and designed by Alphonse Balat. Built between 1874 and 1895, the complex was finished with the completion of the so-called “Iron Church”, a domed greenhouse that would originally serve as the royal chapel. The total floor surface of this immense complex is 2.5 hectares (270,000 square feet). 800,000 liters (over 200,000 US gallons) of fuel oil are needed each year to heat the buildings.

The complex can only be visited during a two-week period in April–May each year, when most flowers are in full bloom.

Credits : [Wikipedia] [Olivier Polet] [Luc Viatour]

steampunktendencies:

Treehouse, Redmond, USA, by Steve Rondel http://goo.gl/B4RMuF

Steve Rondel’s children grew up before he could finish this exeptional treehouse. He started it 20 years ago when his oldest son was 5. Now he is looking for grandchildren to give him an excuse to push on.”